PALAPALAI RANDOM

Designer Manaola depicts the beautiful silhouette of delicate forest ferns in a set of artistic compositions.

Childhood memories of gathering Palapalai ferns in the mountains are a familial tradition still carried on today.  Manaola recalls traveling to the misty uplands with his family to acquire Palapalai ferns early in the morning dew.  It is these cherished times shared that have set the base of inspiration for Manaola’s hand drawn illustrations.

Palapalai ferns are prized among Hula dancers as an embodiment of Laka the goddess of Hula (Dance). Their soft segmented leaves can be found in shady areas at the base of native forests. In cultural practice, the fronds of the Palapalai were fashioned into lei (garlands) and placed on the altar of the goddess Laka to invoke the spirit of the dance to enter and bring forth inspiration.  Lei are made by carefully plating these delicate ferns together in a braided manner and worn by the Hula dancer. It is believed that the use of these adornments assimilate the likeness of the leaf bodies in the forest. As the Palapalai move gracefully in the slightest of winds, so does the dancer move with the elemental movements of nature.

Traditional songs and dances refer to their dainty character and fine palp that gathers moisture from the mist and rain.  Thus the Palapalai pattern embodies the lush verdure of the forest realm and the vivacious spirit of the water cycles that sustain abundant growth.  It is the thriving qualities of the wildwood that are honored by this native leaf body and continue to inspire natural movement as we dance through everyday life. It is Manaola’s wish that this artistic piece captures the beauty of the forest realm, bringing nature's inspiration to the modern world.

PALAPALAI RANDOM

Designer Manaola depicts the beautiful silhouette of delicate forest ferns in a set of artistic compositions.

Childhood memories of gathering Palapalai ferns in the mountains are a familial tradition still carried on today.  Manaola recalls traveling to the misty uplands with his family to acquire Palapalai ferns early in the morning dew.  It is these cherished times shared that have set the base of inspiration for Manaola’s hand drawn illustrations.

Palapalai ferns are prized among Hula dancers as an embodiment of Laka the goddess of Hula (Dance). Their soft segmented leaves can be found in shady areas at the base of native forests. In cultural practice, the fronds of the Palapalai were fashioned into lei (garlands) and placed on the altar of the goddess Laka to invoke the spirit of the dance to enter and bring forth inspiration.  Lei are made by carefully plating these delicate ferns together in a braided manner and worn by the Hula dancer. It is believed that the use of these adornments assimilate the likeness of the leaf bodies in the forest. As the Palapalai move gracefully in the slightest of winds, so does the dancer move with the elemental movements of nature.

Traditional songs and dances refer to their dainty character and fine palp that gathers moisture from the mist and rain.  Thus the Palapalai pattern embodies the lush verdure of the forest realm and the vivacious spirit of the water cycles that sustain abundant growth.  It is the thriving qualities of the wildwood that are honored by this native leaf body and continue to inspire natural movement as we dance through everyday life. It is Manaola’s wish that this artistic piece captures the beauty of the forest realm, bringing nature's inspiration to the modern world.

PALAPALAI ABSTRACT

Designer Manaola depicts the beautiful silhouette of delicate forest ferns in a set of artistic compositions.

Childhood memories of gathering Palapalai ferns in the mountains are a familial tradition still carried on today.  Manaola recalls traveling to the misty uplands with his family to acquire Palapalai ferns early in the morning dew.  It is these cherished times shared that have set the base of inspiration for Manaola’s hand drawn illustrations.

Palapalai ferns are prized among Hula dancers as an embodiment of Laka the goddess of Hula (Dance). Their soft segmented leaves can be found in shady areas at the base of native forests. In cultural practice, the fronds of the Palapalai were fashioned into lei (garlands) and placed on the altar of the goddess Laka to invoke the spirit of the dance to enter and bring forth inspiration.  Lei are made by carefully plating these delicate ferns together in a braided manner and worn by the Hula dancer. It is believed that the use of these adornments assimilate the likeness of the leaf bodies in the forest. As the Palapalai move gracefully in the slightest of winds, so does the dancer move with the elemental movements of nature.

Traditional songs and dances refer to their dainty character and fine palp that gathers moisture from the mist and rain.  Thus the Palapalai pattern embodies the lush verdure of the forest realm and the vivacious spirit of the water cycles that sustain abundant growth.  It is the thriving qualities of the wildwood that are honored by this native leaf body and continue to inspire natural movement as we dance through everyday life. It is Manaola’s wish that this artistic piece captures the beauty of the forest realm, bringing nature's inspiration to the modern world.

Manaolaʻs Palapalai Abstract motif draws a parallel between re-imagined Hawaiian floral silhouettes and modern art.  Contemporary geometric shapes represent the angles of sunlight and shade as the sun shines through the branches of the forest canopy. It is the heat of the Sun that pushes the moisture through its vaporous cycles causing a thriving environment for life to flourish.

PALAPALAI ABSTRACT

Designer Manaola depicts the beautiful silhouette of delicate forest ferns in a set of artistic compositions.

Childhood memories of gathering Palapalai ferns in the mountains are a familial tradition still carried on today.  Manaola recalls traveling to the misty uplands with his family to acquire Palapalai ferns early in the morning dew.  It is these cherished times shared that have set the base of inspiration for Manaola’s hand drawn illustrations.

Palapalai ferns are prized among Hula dancers as an embodiment of Laka the goddess of Hula (Dance). Their soft segmented leaves can be found in shady areas at the base of native forests. In cultural practice, the fronds of the Palapalai were fashioned into lei (garlands) and placed on the altar of the goddess Laka to invoke the spirit of the dance to enter and bring forth inspiration.  Lei are made by carefully plating these delicate ferns together in a braided manner and worn by the Hula dancer. It is believed that the use of these adornments assimilate the likeness of the leaf bodies in the forest. As the Palapalai move gracefully in the slightest of winds, so does the dancer move with the elemental movements of nature.

Traditional songs and dances refer to their dainty character and fine palp that gathers moisture from the mist and rain.  Thus the Palapalai pattern embodies the lush verdure of the forest realm and the vivacious spirit of the water cycles that sustain abundant growth.  It is the thriving qualities of the wildwood that are honored by this native leaf body and continue to inspire natural movement as we dance through everyday life. It is Manaola’s wish that this artistic piece captures the beauty of the forest realm, bringing nature's inspiration to the modern world.

Manaolaʻs Palapalai Abstract motif draws a parallel between re-imagined Hawaiian floral silhouettes and modern art.  Contemporary geometric shapes represent the angles of sunlight and shade as the sun shines through the branches of the forest canopy. It is the heat of the Sun that pushes the moisture through its vaporous cycles causing a thriving environment for life to flourish.

PĀLULU

The Pālulu Print is an ode to the patterns of protection found in the natural world. Traditionally, the leaves and stalks of the Mai`a (Banana) were cut diagonally and used as stamps. Intricate symmetrical designs resembling crescent moons were printed in rows creating an ocean of repetitive motifs. The pattern then transforms into a new inspiration and meaning. Pālulu means a shield of protection. As Designer Manaola printed he began to see the scales of the i`a (fish) and the feathers of the manu (birds) unfold across the art piece. Scales and feathers protect the winged and oceanic creatures of the elemental nations. Scales will change in color to deflect and distract while feathers shield in wind and rain. They are diverse in brightness and size and are beautiful to the sight. The intention of this pattern is to serve as a symbol of protection for whoever is called to adorn in this natural motif, shaped by the earth and reimagined into `a`ahu (adornments) that will continue to be a reminder of beauty in strength.

PĀLULU

The Pālulu Print is an ode to the patterns of protection found in the natural world. Traditionally, the leaves and stalks of the Mai`a (Banana) were cut diagonally and used as stamps. Intricate symmetrical designs resembling crescent moons were printed in rows creating an ocean of repetitive motifs. The pattern then transforms into a new inspiration and meaning. Pālulu means a shield of protection. As Designer Manaola printed he began to see the scales of the i`a (fish) and the feathers of the manu (birds) unfold across the art piece. Scales and feathers protect the winged and oceanic creatures of the elemental nations. Scales will change in color to deflect and distract while feathers shield in wind and rain. They are diverse in brightness and size and are beautiful to the sight. The intention of this pattern is to serve as a symbol of protection for whoever is called to adorn in this natural motif, shaped by the earth and reimagined into `a`ahu (adornments) that will continue to be a reminder of beauty in strength.

HONUAMEA

E ō Pele Honuamea

Ke kumu o ke ahi o Hulinu‘u

Nei ka leo o ka pōhaku

Kawewe ka ua maka o Kauwila

Nakeke akula i ka mole o ka honua

“The land resounds as her life force pulsates, roaring through the foundation of the earth’s core...” She is “Honuamea” ... “Sacred Earth.” Manaola returns to his familial grounding to an ancestral consciousness rooted in the foundation herself, “Pele-honuamea ~ Pele in her land creation form,” and fashions this homage reflective of the mana she inherits from her mother Haumea, the matrilineal divine of possibilities. Thus, a design of circular patterns representative of the chemistry she receives in her chromosones honorific of the female cosmos, along with geometric depictions of volcanic activity detailing the movement in her magmatic force to create new land.

Manaola looks through a traditional lens at what is often presumed as cataclysmic, and conceptualizes this heirloom engaged by a Hawaiian world view that venerates the cyclical nature of our home environment, in that “There is never a definitive ending. There are only the beginning and ending of cycles.” Therefore, as she vents through the earth’s mantle to create new land, Manaola too bursts through the common crust of wearable art to produce this mantle of fashion to shoulder creation. Honuamea is the assurance that with the creation of new land is the promise of new foundations and its global potential for classic innovation.

HONUAMEA

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HAUMEA

“o Haumea ka wahine hānau kupanaha a hānau wawā”

Haumea the woman of miraculous and tumultuous births

From the goddess Poʻele, who is the endless womb of night, to the reproductive cycles of our natural world, the Loina Wahine or female principals have always stood supreme in native creation stories as the portal of all creation and holders of sacred space.

Designer Manaola pays tribute to life and creation by honoring the divine feminine, the great ancestress of fertility and childbirth, Haumea.  Her name Haumea references Hānaumea or she who gives birth.  As a divine embodiment of the sacred feminine she is known as the mother of many elemental gods and goddesses to whom were born from different parts of her body.  Haumea’s notorious child is that of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanic activity.    Her powers of miraculous birthing allows her to take many forms as she re-emerges through different periods of our mythology.  In her land creation form she is also referred to as Mother Earth Papa, or Papahānaumoku “Papa the birther of lands”. Papa alongside Wakea, the Sky Father, is known as the progenitorʻs of the Hawaiian islands and race connecting us back to the land and stars.  In Hawaiian thought, women are the physical embodiment of Haumea as they are the gatekeepers of life and represent earth itself laying the foundation of our world and our cosmos.

Manaola’s carved patterns represent the divine portal of creation.  The repetitive rows show the long matrilineal succession who have carried the legacy of life through generations. Manaola intends this motif to honor the goddess and bring forth the energy of creation and re-birth in all aspects of our lives.

HAUMEA

“o Haumea ka wahine hānau kupanaha a hānau wawā”

Haumea the woman of miraculous and tumultuous births

From the goddess Poʻele, who is the endless womb of night, to the reproductive cycles of our natural world, the Loina Wahine or female principals have always stood supreme in native creation stories as the portal of all creation and holders of sacred space.

Designer Manaola pays tribute to life and creation by honoring the divine feminine, the great ancestress of fertility and childbirth, Haumea.  Her name Haumea references Hānaumea or she who gives birth.  As a divine embodiment of the sacred feminine she is known as the mother of many elemental gods and goddesses to whom were born from different parts of her body.  Haumea’s notorious child is that of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanic activity.    Her powers of miraculous birthing allows her to take many forms as she re-emerges through different periods of our mythology.  In her land creation form she is also referred to as Mother Earth Papa, or Papahānaumoku “Papa the birther of lands”. Papa alongside Wakea, the Sky Father, is known as the progenitorʻs of the Hawaiian islands and race connecting us back to the land and stars.  In Hawaiian thought, women are the physical embodiment of Haumea as they are the gatekeepers of life and represent earth itself laying the foundation of our world and our cosmos.

Manaola’s carved patterns represent the divine portal of creation.  The repetitive rows show the long matrilineal succession who have carried the legacy of life through generations. Manaola intends this motif to honor the goddess and bring forth the energy of creation and re-birth in all aspects of our lives.